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SHOWING 118 RESULTS
Tff16 laurel awardwinner revised
The award for Best New Narrative Director goes to Children of the Mountain directed by Priscilla Anany.

When a young woman gives birth to a deformed and sickly child, she becomes the victim of cruelty and superstition in her Ghanaian community. Discarded by her lover, she is convinced she suffers from a ‘dirty womb,’ and embarks on a journey to heal her son and create a future for them both. |Read More
Tff17 laurel newnarrativedirector
Award Screening: Best New Narrative Director: Keep the Change

In a support group, David—a smooth talker struggling to hide his disability—meets a woman with similar learning challenges, and they quickly forge an intimate bond. Starring a cast of nonprofessional actors on the autism spectrum, Keep the Change details an underrepresented community with authenticity, optimism and humor. |Read More
Aw nnd
Like surprises? Buy a ticket in advance to this Awards screening, which will be selected by the Best New Narrative Feature jury. Or buy an awards pass for access to all awards screenings here. The Best New Narrative Director goes to Men Go To Battle.

Kentucky, 1861. Francis and Henry Mellon depend on each other to keep their unkempt estate afloat as winter encroaches. After Francis takes a casual fight too far, Henry ventures off in the night, leaving each of them to struggle through the wartime on their own. |Read More
Tff17 laurel screenplayintlnarr
Award Screening: Best Screenplay, International Narrative Competition: Ice Mother

Hana lives alone in a big villa with only weekly visits from her two belligerent sons and their families to look forward to. While on a stroll with her grandson one day, she rescues Brona, an elderly ice swimmer with a hen for a best friend, from drowning. This encounter invigorates Hana, introducing her to a new hobby and unexpected romance. |Read More
Tff16 laurel awardwinner revised
The award for Best Screenplay, International Narrative Competition goes to Perfect Strangers, written by Filippo Bologna, Paolo Costella, Paolo Genovese, Paola Mammini, and Rolando Ravello.

Paolo Genovese's new film brings us a bitter ensemble with an all star cast that poses the question: How well do we really know those close to us? During a dinner party, three couples and a bachelor decide to play a dangerous game with their cell phones. Brilliantly executed and scripted, Perfect Strangers reveals the true nature of how we connect to each other.​ |Read More
Tff17 laurel screenplayusnarrative
Award Screening: Best Screenplay, US Narrative Competition: Abundant Acreage Available

Still reeling over the recent death of their father, siblings Jesse (Terry Kinney) and Tracy (Amy Ryan) are attempting to settle into their new lives in his absence. Their simple existence is unexpectedly disrupted by the sudden arrival of three mysterious brothers, camping on their land and possessing a surprising connection to their family farm. |Read More
Tff16 laurel awardwinner revised
The award for Best Screenplay, US Narrative Competition goes to Women Who Kill, written by Ingrid Jungermann

Morgan and Jean work well together as true crime podcasters because they didn’t work well, at all, as a couple. When Morgan strikes up a new relationship with the mysterious Simone, their shared interest turns into suspicion, paranoia, and fear. Ingrid Jungermann’s whip smart feature debut is an adept and wry comedy on modern romance’s hollow results, set in an LGBTQ Brooklyn. |Read More
Aw screen play
Like surprises? Buy a ticket in advance to this Awards screening, which will be selected by the World Narrative Competition jury. Or buy an awards pass for access to all awards screenings here. The Best Screenplay goes to Virgin Mountain.

Fúsi is a mammoth of a man who at 43-years-old is still living at home with his mother. Shy and awkward, he hasn’t quite learned how to socialize with others, leaving him as an untouchable inexperienced virgin. That is until his family pushes him to join a dance class, where he meets the equally innocent but playful Sjöfn. |Read More

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